Tuesday, December 27, 2016

Tweet by worm on a string on Twitter

worm on a string (@rieuIe)
cus a few friends didnt know this cheat yet pic.twitter.com/ttgYpzrAkG

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Tuesday, November 1, 2016

Tweet by GurdjieffWork on Twitter

GurdjieffWork (@GurdjieffWork)
Real art is knowledge not talent. ~ #Gurdjieff

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Tweet by Muddy Colors on Twitter

Muddy Colors (@muddycolors)
New post on muddycolors.com // Dorien Iten: Accuracy Training pic.twitter.com/ZznF9f83oG

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Tuesday, October 11, 2016

"Don’t give up. Literally anyone can give up. Be the other person. But at the same time, step back..." [feedly]



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"Don't give up. Literally anyone can give up. Be the other person. But at the same time, step back..."
// Quotes About Comics

"Don't give up. Literally anyone can give up. Be the other person. But at the same time, step back and honestly assess who you are and what you're trying to accomplish and make sure you're doing that. And if not, change course, but don't stop."

- Brian Michael Bendis
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"Comic books, television shows … whenever I saw something or read something that I thought was good,..." [feedly]



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"Comic books, television shows … whenever I saw something or read something that I thought was good,..."
// Quotes About Comics

"Comic books, television shows … whenever I saw something or read something that I thought was good, I tried to back up and figure out why I thought it was good. What was it that made this good? Everything was OK to me, because even the junk, I thought, was alright. But when something stood out, you went, 'Wait a minute, why is that good?'"

- Darwyn Cooke (2007)
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Sunday, August 21, 2016

Tweet by History In Pictures on Twitter

History In Pictures (@HistoryInPix)
Picasso's self-portrait at ages 18, 25, and 90. pic.twitter.com/MKmbGgywqy

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Saturday, August 6, 2016

Tweet by Guillermo del Toro on Twitter

Guillermo del Toro (@RealGDT)
The so-called "Fear of failure" is not real fear but the necessary vertigo /recount of resources vs challenge before taking an artistic leap

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Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Tweet by Colleen Doran on Twitter

Colleen Doran (@ColleenDoran)
BTW the only known photo of JC Leyendecker's model and lover Charles Beach. Sorry can't recall where I pinched this. pic.twitter.com/GC5hP2Aj2y

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Tuesday, July 19, 2016

Gender Contrasts [feedly]



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Gender Contrasts
// Gurney Journey

Third Place, Illusion of the Year, 2009
What can you say about the gender of these two faces? 

They're sort of on the borderline, but if you had to say one was male and the other was female, what would you say?

Most people say the face on the left is female and the one on the right is male.

This is just an illusion because they're both the same androgynous face. The only difference is that the contrast of the features is increased in the face on the left, and the contrast is reduced in the face on the right.

According to the psychologist Richard Russell, who created of this illusion, "Contrast is an important cue for perceiving the sex of a face, with greater contrast appearing feminine, and lesser contrast appearing masculine."

He observes that cosmetics in women serves to heighten this difference, increasing the contrast, particularly around the eyes and mouth. "Female facial beauty is known to be closely linked to sex differences," he says, "with femininity considered attractive. These results suggest that cosmetics may function in part by exaggerating a sexually dimorphic attribute—facial contrast—to make the face appear more feminine and hence attractive."

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Tweet by Renae De Liz on Twitter

Renae De Liz (@RenaeDeLiz)
Q: As an artist, what can I consider if I want to de-objectify & add power to female characters? Tips in this thread pic.twitter.com/DEKF1p6YFd

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Sunday, July 17, 2016

Plein-Air Portraiture in International Artist [feedly]



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Plein-Air Portraiture in International Artist
// Gurney Journey


The upcoming August/September issue of International Artist magazine contains my article "Painting Candid Portraits in the Wild," which recaps nine recent adventures in plein-air portraiture.

In the article I address a question that comes up often:

Is it OK to Sketch Strangers in Public?
Yes. In most public places people have no expectation of privacy, and you have a right to sketch them. However, for both ethical and practical reasons, it's better to assume otherwise. Whenever someone notices that I'm sketching them, I try to introduce myself, and I show them what I'm up to. My standard line is: "Hi, I'm just getting some practice sketching people, hope you don't mind. Keep doing what you're doing. I'll be done in five more minutes and I'll show you when I finish." Most often, they just want to take a photo for Facebook. If they look annoyed after I say that line, I'll switch to someone else. But nine times out of ten, being open will erase their worries and perhaps make a friend. Sometimes I'm sitting too far away to make such a connection, or I'm dealing with a language barrier. In that case, I hold up the sketchbook and smile. That clears the air and gives them the opportunity to decline politely. If I want to do a portrait with a lot more commitment, rather than stealth sketching, it's best to get permission and set the terms at the outset. Then I can say something like, "Hey, are you going to be around here a while? I'm an artist and I'd love to sketch your portrait while we talk."

International Artist was voted the Best Art Magazine by GJ readers. 

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Tuesday, June 21, 2016

Honoré Daumier: The Michelangelo of Caricature [feedly]



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Honoré Daumier: The Michelangelo of Caricature
// Print Magazine

"There is a lot of Michelangelo in that fellow," observed realist author and playwright Honoré Balzac in reference to Honoré Daumier. As one of the well-known artists of the French Realism Movement, an era of artists who honed in on real life often featuring commoners and laborers as their subjects, Daumier captured the moments of the time on a variety of mediums, including painting, lithography, sculpture, satirical cartoons and caricatures.

Honoré Daumier, Voyageurs appréciant de moins en moins les wagons de troisième classe..., French, 1808 - 1879, published 1856, lithograph on wove paper, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund. Image from National Gallery of Art

Honoré Daumier, Voyageurs appréciant de moins en moins les wagons de troisième classe…, French, 1808 – 1879, published 1856, lithograph on wove paper, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund.
Image from National Gallery of Art

Honoré Daumier: Realism, Satire and Caricatures

The National Gallery of Art's Lorenz Eitner notes that his body of work highlights "the characteristic look and demeanor of every segment of Parisian society, ranging from the crotchets and timidities of the urban middle class with which he fondly empathized (Les Bons Bourgeois), to the frauds of speculators (Robert Macaire), the pomposities of lawyers (Gens de justice), the self-delusions of artists, the rapacity of landlords, and the vanity of bluestockings. " His abhorrence for lawyers appears to stem from his early employment as an errand boy for attorneys. He also paid particular attention to King Louise-Phillipe, which eventually provoked the sovereign to sentence Daumier to jail for six months due to the harshness of Daumier's wit in the satirical cartoon of the king.

Honoré Daumier (French, 1808 - 1879 ), Les Tritons de la Seine, 1864, lithograph, Rosenwald Collection 1943.3.3205 From the National Gallery of Art

Honoré Daumier (French, 1808 – 1879 ), Les Tritons de la Seine, 1864, lithograph, Rosenwald Collection 1943.3.3205
From the National Gallery of Art

His 40-year career creating satirical cartoons was chronicled in the French journals, La Silhouette, La Caricature and Le Charivari. His ascent into cartooning stems from the help of a family friend, Alexandre Lenoir, who provided Daumier informal training in drawing since Daumier's family couldn't afford to send him to art school. After copying Lenoir's art collection and the works from the Louvre, Daumier landed a fortunate apprenticeship with a lithographer who taught Daumier the technical aspects of printmaking. From there, the publisher of La Silhouette, La Caricature and Le Charivari hired Daumier around 1829 to be a cartoonist for the satirical publications.

 

Honoré Daumier (French, 1808 - 1879 ), Un Abus de confiance, 1842, lithograph on newsprint, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund 1979.49.105 From the National Gallery of Art

Honoré Daumier (French, 1808 – 1879 ), Un Abus de confiance, 1842, lithograph on newsprint, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund 1979.49.105 From the National Gallery of Art

Honoré Daumier (French, 1808 - 1879 ), Des gens dont le soleil réjouit peu la vue, 1855, lithograph, Rosenwald Collection 1958.8.64 From the National Gallery of Art

Honoré Daumier (French, 1808 – 1879 ), Des gens dont le soleil réjouit peu la vue, 1855, lithograph, Rosenwald Collection 1958.8.64 From the National Gallery of Art

Honoré Daumier (French, 1808 - 1879 ), Le Tondeur de chiens, 1842, lithograph on newsprint, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund 1979.49.40 From the National Gallery of Art

Honoré Daumier (French, 1808 – 1879 ), Le Tondeur de chiens, 1842, lithograph on newsprint, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund 1979.49.40 From the National Gallery of Art

Honoré Daumier (French, 1808 - 1879 ), Ce que certains journaux appeleraient..., 1870, lithograph, Rosenwald Collection 1943.3.3207 From the National Gallery of Art

Honoré Daumier (French, 1808 – 1879 ), Ce que certains journaux appeleraient…, 1870, lithograph, Rosenwald Collection 1943.3.3207 From the National Gallery of Art

Honoré Daumier (French, 1808 - 1879 ), Daumier fut le peintre ordinaire..., probably 1839, lithograph on newsprint, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund 1979.49.254

Honoré Daumier (French, 1808 – 1879 ), Daumier fut le peintre ordinaire…, probably 1839, lithograph on newsprint, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund 1979.49.254


If you enjoyed this brief history on the realism artist, Honoré Daumier, and would like to dive more into art history, check out the History of Art course on HOW Design University. You'll explore art history from a broad thematic perspective, looking at art through the lens of nature, the human body, society, religion, and politics. Engaging lectures and projects will challenge you to research and analyze the artists that interest you, opening up new channels of inspiration for your work.

 

 

 

The post Honoré Daumier: The Michelangelo of Caricature appeared first on Print Magazine.


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Wednesday, June 1, 2016

Google offers tools for creating art using AI [feedly]



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Google offers tools for creating art using AI
// Engadget

Google doesn't just want to dabble in using AI to create art -- it wants you to make that art yourself. As promised, the search giant has launched its Magenta project to give artists tools for bringing machine learning to their creations. The initial effort focuses around an open source infrastructure for producing audio and video that, ideally, heads off in unexpected directions while maintaining the better traits of human-made art.

Ultimately, Google doesn't just want the technology to produce 'optimal' art based on what it learns from samples. It's hoping for the same imbalance (that is, focusing on one element over others), surprise and long-term narratives that you see in people-powered projects. It should feel like there's a distinct personality to a song or video.

You can look at Google's early Magenta code right now, and the company is vowing to accept both code and blog posts from outsiders who have something to add. If enough people rally around the idea, you could see a budding community of artists who add AI flourishes to their productions.

Source: Magenta, GitHub


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Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Drawing the Nose [feedly]



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Drawing the Nose
// Artist's Network

Focus on the Features: The Nose

Understanding the basic structures of the various facial features goes a long way in achieving a realistic depiction. (An excerpt from Drawing Expressive Portraits)

By Paul Leveille
How to draw a nose | Paul Leveille, ArtistsNetwork.com

 

The features are what make human faces so interesting. Although most features are constructed similarly from person to person, each individual still exhibits subtle and not so subtle differences. For example, each nose has a bridge followed by cartilage and two nostrils, but some noses are thin while others are broad; some are turned up and others are hooked; and so on.

Here I'll explain the basic structures of the nose and how to draw them.

By a Nose

One of the most distinctive features of the human head is the nose. It protrudes more than any other feature and gives the face depth and character. Although the variety of nose shapes seems endless, all noses have the same basic triangular form: narrow at the top, and wider and fuller at the bottom.

The upper part of the nose, the bridge, is formed by bone. The lower part consists of five pieces of cartilage: Two pieces make up the tip, two make up the wings of the nostrils, and one divides the nostrils. (See The Structure of the Nose, A.)


The Structure of the Nose

How to draw a nose | Paul Leveille, ArtistsNetwork.com
A Seen from below, the five pieces of cartilage that make up the lower part of the nose are apparent. The nostrils are closer together toward the tip of the nose and get farther apart toward the cheeks.

 

How to draw a nose | Paul Leveille, ArtistsNetwork.com
B The skin lies smoothly over the bone of the upper nose, usually catching a highlight. Highlights on the tip of the nose will make it appear to come forward.

 

How to draw a nose | Paul Leveille, ArtistsNetwork.com
C Drawing the nose at different and unusual angles will help you understand its shape.

 

How to draw a nose | Paul Leveille, ArtistsNetwork.com
D Though there are all kinds of nose shapes, all noses are basically thinner and narrower at the bridge and fuller at the bottom. Some even have a ball- or bulb-shape at the bottom.


A Nose in Three Steps

 

How to draw a nose | Paul Leveille, ArtistsNetwork.com
1. When first drawing the nose, simplify it into a wedge-shaped series of planes.

 

How to draw a nose | Paul Leveille, ArtistsNetwork.com
2. To define the subtle shapes of bone and cartilage within the wedge shapes, start to draw the rounded forms of the bridge, the tip of the nose and the nostrils. Notice how the bulb part of the nose tapers into the bridge.

 

How to draw a nose | Paul Leveille, ArtistsNetwork.com
3.Continue by rendering the light and dark areas. Save the white of your paper for the highlights, or lift them out with an eraser.


Paul Leveille paints portraits of nationally and internationally distinguished clients and also conducts portrait painting workshops and demonstrations around the country. He lives in western Massachusetts. See his website at www.paulleveillestudio.comDrawing Expressive Portraits | ArtistsNetwork.com

This article is excerpted from his book, Drawing Expressive Portraits, © 2001 by Paul Leveille, used with permission from North Light Books, an imprint of F+W Media Inc. Visit your local bookseller, call 800/258-0929 or go to www.northlightshop.com to obtain a copy.

 

The post Drawing the Nose appeared first on Artist's Network.


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Tuesday, February 23, 2016

Free Figure Model Resource [feedly]



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Free Figure Model Resource
// Muddy Colors

-By Arnie Fenner


Back in 2014 I did a post about a free resource for nude models on YouTube. Since there are always new visitors to MC and blogger doesn't make searching the archives particularly easy, I thought it would be helpful to remind everyone of these invaluable videos.

If you don't have access to live models or figure drawing classes (or the funds to hire or attend either) the Croquis Cafe: The Artist Model Resource is a lifesaver. At this point there are several hundred videos with new additions posted fairly regularly. Poses are held from 1 to 5 minutes, you can freeze frames for as long as you might need, and the various videos feature men and women of all ethnicities and body types.

These videos are not the least bit salacious—but obviously are "not safe for work" or intended for the easily offended or for kids. Or for immature mooks looking for a cheap thrill. Using models (nude and clothed), of course, is an important part of being an artist; anatomy is a life-long study and if the artist doesn't know what the body does—in action or repose—they can't understand why clothes hang or fly or drape the way they do. If the artist understands the body—knows their anatomy as best they can—they can convincingly make their characters do anything.





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Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Tension and Tragedy: Beautifully Haunting Works by Alice Wellinger [feedly]



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Tension and Tragedy: Beautifully Haunting Works by Alice Wellinger
// Brown Paper Bag

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Artist and illustrator Alice Wellinger creates surreal imagery that deals with the troubles of daily life and of childhood memories. Her realistic approach to these figures and accompanying subjects has a eerie effect—it's as if they actually exist, but in a way that's similar to a vivid dream. Did these things really happen or was it just a figment of your imagination?

Her conceptual—and often, thematically dark—work lends itself well to things that aren't so cheery. Most recently, she created a series of illustrations about Shakespeare's famous tragedy, Othello.

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The post Tension and Tragedy: Beautifully Haunting Works by Alice Wellinger appeared first on Brown Paper Bag.


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