Friday, October 31, 2014

lebody: Le corpus humain et grandeur naturelle planches... [feedly]



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lebody: Le corpus humain et grandeur naturelle planches...
// Art and Reference point



lebody:

Le corpus humain et grandeur naturelle planches coloriées et superposées, avec texte explicatif- Julien Bouglé, 1899.


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Saturday, October 25, 2014

hhhhh your art is so beautiful u v u. I'm wondering if you could do some references on backs? Of course only if you have time and feel like doing so o v o;;; [feedly]



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hhhhh your art is so beautiful u v u. I'm wondering if you could do some references on backs? Of course only if you have time and feel like doing so o v o;;;
// Art and Reference point

forgive my handwriting I HOPE THIS HELPS A LITTLE BC IM NOT RLY SURE IF IT MAKES SENSE also here are some pics of rl backs which you can also locate via google 1,2,3,4,5(nsfw bc butt) 


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Seven pieces of good advice that stayed with me [feedly]



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Seven pieces of good advice that stayed with me
// Muddy Colors

as usual, interpret this image however you please
David Palumbo

Last week, while recording an interview for an upcoming episode of Creative Trek, I was asked to share a piece of advice which has stayed with me over the years.  A few jumped to my mind at that moment and then later that day I kept thinking of others, so I thoughts I'd jot a few down here on Muddy Colors. 

1: Be prepared to pay your dues

I grew up in a family of artists, so it is inevitable that much of the good advice I've received over the years would come from my parents.  This was one that I heard again and again before I even began learning to paint.  Basically, be grateful for every job you can get because it takes a long time to climb the ladder.  Not every job is going to be fun and/or easy, so be ready to tackle the low rent and uninspired jobs with a professional attitude.  Looking back, I find this to be very much a tightrope.  On the one hand, you don't want to be taken advantage of and there are plenty of people out there looking to exploit you as far as you will let them.  Opposite that, you need to be humble and know that, at least when starting out, you should be following up as many opportunities as possible.  Finding the balance is hard and I think most of us only get it after several stumbles, but a humble attitude will help a great deal.  I've seen several people with tremendous potential wash out because of their egos and an attitude that the world owed them some kind of special treatment.  This is not really a business for prima donnas. 

2: Don't teach yourself the mistakes of others

Early on, I had some ideas about working as a comic artist and was fortunate to have a portfolio review by Joe Quesada.  After looking at my (in hindsight) very crude pages, he told me that he felt I was looking too much at other comic artists and not enough at real life.  He told me that, while you can learn a great deal by copying the work of those who inspire you, the vast majority of your study should be direct observation.  When you copy another artist, you are copying their mistakes and teaching yourself their bad habits.  Working from life, on the other hand, lets you train without that baggage clouding up the picture.  You are much more likely to develop your work into something unique if you learn from the world unfiltered.

3: Lead with the work

About the time that I graduated from PAFA, I was exploring fine art and had a meeting with Neil Zukerman who runs the CFM Gallery in Manhattan.  He was kind enough to talk with me not only about my work but about making contact with galleries cold.  Basically, when someone walks into a gallery off the street and requests a review of their work, the automatic assumption is that it will be either a poor fit for that gallery or just simply horrible.  To save everyone a lot of time (and to avoid the automatic brush-off), he told me to introduce myself while simultaneously handing the curator a sample (print, postcard, etc.) of my very best work.  Maybe they will be interested and maybe not, but it will get things right to the point and hopefully let you lead with a good first impression.

4: Don't worry about being fast, just worry about being good

In my first (of several) portfolio reviews with Magic the Gathering art director Jeremy Jarvis, he wondered if I might be rushing my work.  Many aspects were sloppy and would have been much stronger if I'd simply slowed down and taken my time.  Speed comes from the confidence of experience and, if I wanted to be fast, I first had to learn how to slow down and get good.  Nobody is impressed that you turned out a bad piece quickly, but they are impressed when you turn out something really good.

5: Don't forget to push the design

A year later, I sat down with Jeremy Jarvis again at that same convention for another review.  My new portfolio had all new work which I had taken my time with and paid close attention to strong technique.  What I'd failed to pay attention to was my character, costume, and environmental design.  Jeremy pointed out in piece after piece where I could have pushed things to be more interesting, more lived-in, more unexpected, and just MORE.

6: Don't be scared to be different

As I was starting to get work more steadily, I began feeling frustrated in my process and technique.  I had always felt that, to be a fantasy artist, I should be working in a tightly rendered highly detailed and polished style.  After all, that is what fantasy art usually looks like, right?  My frustration was that I was growing more and more interested by painterly work along the lines of NC Wyeth and other early 20th century illustrators and this was at odds with the mainstream looks.  I was lamenting this to Greg Manchess, one of the few current fantasy artists I knew who did work outside of that tight render box.  After going on and on about how I wished I could work looser but was worried about this and that and the other thing, he just said something along the lines of "well, yeah, I don't know, why don't you just try it?"  I was struck by how simple that made it seem and how ridiculous it was to have not realized this myself.  It was a few years before I really changed my process, but in that time I was working on personal pieces and experiments which ultimately proved to me that I needed to shift direction.  The first and most important step was to stop worrying and just do something.

7: Make your work with purpose

This last one was not advice given specifically to me, but something which I've heard Rebecca Guay say to students many many times.  Whatever you make, you need to make it your own in some way.  Find something to love in every piece, find something personal to contribute to every assignment, and always know what you want for the viewer to feel when they look at your work.  If you don't make your work with purpose, it will have no impact.
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Thursday, October 23, 2014

3 Life Drawing Tips [feedly]



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3 Life Drawing Tips
// Artist Daily

I have a painter-friend who is gearing up to do a major work with figures, but she feels a bit rusty about painting a model in all his or her glory. To help prepare herself, she's set up a series of life-drawing sessions so that she can spend a bit of time drawing models before tackling her actual subject. I thought it was a really good idea, but I was super intimidated when she brought up the idea of me coming along and drawing, even though there will be several other people there sketching as well.

Figure drawing by Degas.
Figure drawing by Degas.
I've decided that I am going to go, because I should go, and I have always liked life drawing models once I'm doing it. I just build up the tension in my head beforehand for whatever reason.

This time, I'm going in with a game plan that includes sticking to three life drawing tips, and here they are:

Start with the gesture. I always feel my eyes bulge out and careen crazily back and forth when I get in front of a model, like I need to catch every nuance or else utter failure is assured. Not true. I plan to step back, take a deep breath, and start with capturing the gesture of the model, the full-body pose, before doing anything else in my sketchbook.

Another of my life-drawing lessons is to focus on proportion. If I can get the head to be the correct size relative to the torso, arms, and legs, then I will know that I am in pretty good shape.

I also plan not to sink into the quicksand of adding too much detail too soon. In my first session, all I want to do is put down simple lines and a basic application of light and shadow on the form. I don't need to go much beyond that, and if I find myself reaching for those finer details I hope a little alarm will go off in my head. Then I'll know to go back and check my proportions, because I bet there is something I am skimming over.

For more chances to harness the power of life drawing into finished paintings in oil and pastel, look into the guide, Paint Like Degas. It focuses solely on Degas' drawing and painting approaches and includes comprehensive art instruction on the subject. Enjoy!


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Drawing Basics: How I Start My Pencil Drawings [feedly]



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Drawing Basics: How I Start My Pencil Drawings
// Artist Daily

From the time I started drawing, I have had a constant battle with myself over how to start. For years I have been looking for the one right way to sketch in a composition or block-in an underpainting. Lately, and with the help of my Studio Incamminati instructors, I have learned that there are several ways to start, and that none of these is "the way" but one of many tools in the toolbox. What a relief!

...(read more)
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Monday, October 20, 2014

Tweet from banksy (@thereaIbanksy)

banksy (@thereaIbanksy)
Good things come to those who believe, better things come to those who are patient, and the best things come to those who don't give up.

Download the official Twitter app here



Friday, October 17, 2014

Medical Students Modeling Beautiful Anatomy [feedly]



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Medical Students Modeling Beautiful Anatomy
// Street Anatomy

Andreas Haase Prometheus Atlas ad photo by Anna Rosa Krau Andreas Haase Prometheus Atlas ad photo by Anna Rosa Krau Andreas Haase Prometheus Atlas ad photo by Anna Rosa Krau Andreas Haase Prometheus Atlas ad photo by Anna Rosa Krau Andreas Haase Prometheus Atlas ad photo by Anna Rosa Krau

A series of print ads and posters art directed by Hamburg based designer, Andreas Haase. The ads were created to promote the Prometheus atlases published by, my favorite creator of anatomy and medical texts, Thieme. They use professional photographs of real medical students overlayed medical illustrations from the atlases. This is first for Prometheus in terms of promoting their atlases in a more artistic way. For them the message is "Beautiful Learning" achieved through stunning and clear medical illustration.

And while this work very much resembles that of Danny Quirk, I do like the photography and the fact that these are real medical students. I should have gone to medical school, how yowza!

For more by Andreas Haase visit hellogoodbye.de. And if you're an artist interested in learning anatomy or a medical student, definitely check out Thieme's atlases. They're what got me through gross anatomy in grad school!

 

Photography by: Anna Rosa Krau

 


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Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Fwd: Love life drawing!


-nate


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Kenzo at Love Life Drawing <kenzo@lovelifedrawing.com>
Date: Wed, Oct 15, 2014 at 5:01 AM
Subject: Love life drawing!
To: greatseamonster@gmail.com


Visions, Compositions and Planning

Chaos can be beautiful, but so can having a plan and seeing it come together

Hi ,

I hope all is well with you. This newsletter is all about planning your drawing before starting to draw.

If you are anything like me, your first instinct when starting a drawing is to put pencil to page and just see what happens. If so, then it might be time to try this– instead of simply drawing, visualise how your drawing will appear on your page and make a plan based on that vision. 

By practising this way sometimes, you will be ensure your composition on the page conveys exactly the feeling you want it to. You will also develop the ability to translate what is in your mind into marks on a page. If you develop this skill, the only limit on your work is your imagination. 

Below are a few basic tips on the planning process:

1 Determine the “extreme points”

These refer to the points of the pose that are furthest to the left and right, as well as top and bottom. For a basic composition capturing the entire pose, you need to plan to have these points fall at least a little distance from the edges of the page.

2 Figure out whether the canvas should be portrait or landscape

For a simple composition, if the height of the model’s pose is longer than the width, then the page orientation should be portrait. If the width is wide is longer than the length, then the orientation should be landscape.

3 Try starting with quick thumbnails.

Draw some little rectangles with proportions roughly matching your page (if using standard paper sizes, you can draw rectangles with width 4cm and height 3cm for landscape or vice versa for portrait drawings). Within your rectangles, draw some very rough versions of the pose, altering the composition in each.

You can try having the pose higher or lower on the page, zoom in on one area of the pose or zoom out and keep plenty of white space around it. The thumbnail sketches help you to visualize different composition options before you commit to one. Quick note: if you already always make a plan and have a vision when you draw, then it may be useful to try doing what we disorganized people like to do – just start drawing and let chaos guide you.
 
I hope you found this useful. There's plenty more information at lovelifedrawing.com and especially in our online course.
 
Have a lovely day!

Kenzo
Copyright © 2014 lovelifedrawing, All rights reserved.
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Sunday, October 12, 2014

grizandnorm:Tuesday Tip --- The NoseHere's the way I approach... [feedly]

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tip —- The NoseHere’s the way I approach...
http://anatomicalart.tumblr.com/post/99490836099

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grizandnorm:Tuesday Tip --- The NoseHere's the way I approach... [feedly]

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tip —- The NoseHere’s the way I approach...
http://anatomicalart.tumblr.com/post/99490836099

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Like Seeing Myself in the Mirror [feedly]



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Like Seeing Myself in the Mirror
// Artist Daily

Drawing by Edward Schmidt.
Drawing by Edward Schmidt.

When I was the one in charge of my infant cousin, I would always scramble frantically for ways to keep him entertained. Toys, sounds, and funny faces—I tried everything. But the most memorable way I kept him happy was by plopping him in front of a mirror.

He'd move, and react to seeing himself move, and get excited, clap and chuckle, and then his eyes would get really big to see all that happen right in front of him and he'd get excited all over again.

I keep his reaction in mind as I constantly try to figure out how to draw people—getting to a place where drawing faces and expressions and body positions is exciting and interesting every time. Because it seems like a real shame that there are so many possible ways of drawing people and yet we often see or use only slight variations in a few poses over and over again.

We've got to learn to push the boundaries in our art, even if it means the final product isn't a resounding success. Don't get derailed by the idea of presenting perfection and symmetry. I put a much higher value on close inspection and drawing people as individuals. It is fun, real, and rewarding.

Marin by Elisabeth Ehmann, drawing.
Marin by Elisabeth Ehmann, drawing.
You learn a lot by exploring something new because you stretch yourself in new ways. I know I always get way more out of covering new ground than when I go through the same tired motions, even if it is a little more challenging. It feels good.

And drawing faces and figures with excitement and freshness of vision usually starts with knowing how to draw a person's form and features. Oil Painting Portraits the Easy Way, Watercolor Portraits the Easy Way and Pastel Portraits the Easy Way are a few of my favorite video guides and seem custom-made for this kind of artistic growth no matter the medium you work with. You'll find a professional portraitist's best advice, portrait know-how, the essentials on how to craft your skills, and inspiration from an artist whose work stands out for its uniqueness and point of view. Enjoy!

P.S. If you want to see a great demonstration of drawing the eyes, check out our newest free instructional video from artist David Kassan.

 


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coffeeandcockatiels: paperbeatsscissors: the struggle is... [feedly]



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coffeeandcockatiels: paperbeatsscissors: the struggle is...
// Art and Reference point



coffeeandcockatiels:

paperbeatsscissors:

the struggle is real

Tiniest foot tutorial. Can add toes or just have shoe. Is good. Have day.


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Saturday, October 11, 2014

hammpix: As an artist, you’ll have to draw turned heads... [feedly]



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hammpix: As an artist, you'll have to draw turned heads...
// Art and Reference point







hammpix:

As an artist, you'll have to draw turned heads countless times. But when the head is turned, drawing the far eye poses a special challenge. This is because we must foreshorten that eye more than we're used to, and because we're tempted to shape it like the near eye, which is less foreshortened. Therefore, it's useful to practice drawing the far eye by itself, without the near eye to throw you off. Print these sheets, draw the eyes, and you'll save yourself great difficulty later.

Note that all of these eyes are facing our left. You'll need to practice right-facing eyes as well, so flop the sheets in Photoshop, print them again, and draw those also.


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Eye Candy for Today: JC Leyendecker illustration for Arrow Shirt advertisement [feedly]



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Eye Candy for Today: JC Leyendecker illustration for Arrow Shirt advertisement
// lines and colors

Illustration for Arrow Shirt advertisement, JC Leyendecker
Illustration for Arrow Shirt advertisement, JC Leyendecker

Need I comment?

Image is from The Golden Age blog, where you can find many more (Timesink Warning!!)


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Sunday, October 5, 2014

Art - John_William_Waterhouse -Cleopatra_-_ [feedly]



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crazyhamlet: e1n: I think regardless of style or personality,... [feedly]



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crazyhamlet: e1n: I think regardless of style or personality,...
// Art and Reference point





crazyhamlet:

e1n:

I think regardless of style or personality, your character should run properly. Awkward run ruins everything.

Don't believe me? Try running the wrong way, see how far that gets you.

For clarity's sake: the difference between right and wrong here is the arms. Your arms travel opposite your legs.


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Friday, October 3, 2014

littleulvar: nidotortle said: tips on drawing from different perspectives or trying to draw... [feedly]



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littleulvar: nidotortle said: tips on drawing from different perspectives or trying to draw...
// Art and Reference point

littleulvar:

tips on drawing from different perspectives or trying to draw specific poses? I need help pls ;-;

when it comes to specific poses I try to first draw the most basic shapes and movement lines and then gradually go into more and more details, like so:

image

image

if you have difficulties with perspective, try drawing a perspective grid first:

image

it's nothing different than tips from other artists, but I hope it helped a little ;u;


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Anatomy for Artists Online Course » Scott Eaton Studios [feedly]



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Anatomy for Artists Online Course » Scott Eaton Studios
http://www.scott-eaton.com/anatomy-for-artists-online-course
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makanidotdot: i like necks a lot yeh lets talk about necks!!!... [feedly]



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makanidotdot: i like necks a lot yeh lets talk about necks!!!...
// Art and Reference point















makanidotdot:

image

i like necks a lot yeh lets talk about necks!!! u gotta know what's going on in there to draw necks, here's a fairly simple run down.

Also a lot (most all) of my anatomy knowledge comes from taking Scott Eaton's anatomy for artists course.  If you have a chance/money to take it, it's really great.  


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